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New report states 7–9 billion tonnes of CO2 must be sustainably removed per year to hit climate targets

The 2024 State of Carbon Dioxide Removal report co-led by researchers at the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment in the School of Geography and the Environment, finds that around 7–9 billion tonnes of CO2 per year will need to be removed by mid-century from the atmosphere if the world is to meet the 1.5°C Paris Agreement target.  The authors stress that reducing emissions is the primary way to achieve net-zero, but Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) has a critical role to play. 

New report states 7–9 billion tonnes of CO2 must be sustainably removed per year to hit climate targets

The 2024 State of Carbon Dioxide Removal report co-led by researchers at the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment in the School of Geography and the Environment, finds that around 7–9 billion tonnes of CO2 per year will need to be removed by mid-century from the atmosphere if the world is to meet the 1.5°C Paris Agreement target.  The authors stress that reducing emissions is the primary way to achieve net-zero, but Carbon Dioxide Removal (CDR) has a critical role to play. 

Image: MUNTHITA / Adobe Stock
IN THE MEDIA

Not a Zero-Waste of time! Interview with Professor Anna Lora-Wainwright

What does the future of zero-waste living look like in urban China? This interview with Professor Anna Lora-Wainwright explains the many forms that everyday environmentalist activism can take, and also explores the role of the individual and the state in zero-waste living. 

Waste in China
IN THE MEDIA

Oxford Geoscience Professor Myles Allen On Solving The Problem Of Climate Change

Myles Allen has been studying how human and natural influences contribute to climate change since the early 1990s, served on the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) for its 3rd, 4th and 5th Assessments, and was a Coordinating Lead Author for its special report on 'the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels,’ and has been dubbed by the BBC “the physicist behind net zero”.

Earth from space
IN THE MEDIA

Floods in south Brazil have displaced 600,000 – here’s why this region is likely to see ever more extreme rain in future

A mighty river is flowing out of the Amazon rainforest, and it’s not the one you’re thinking of. In the first kilometre above the forest canopy, a “flying river” is transporting moisture evaporated from Amazonian trees southwards along the Andes mountains towards Rio Grande do Sul, the southernmost state in Brazil. Almost the entire state - an area larger than the UK - is currently affected by unprecedented floods. The flying river has acted like a firehose, fuelling five months of rainfall in just two weeks, further enhanced by a strong jetstream located in just the wrong position above the region. In an article for The Conversation, Dr Marcia Zilli, Dr Neil Hart, and colleague Dr Caio Coelho, explore why - based on future projections of climate change - this situation will likely get worse as the temperature rises.

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IN THE MEDIA