Jonathan checks the maximum temperature of 33.5 degrees on 1st July at Oxford University's Radcliffe Meteorological Station

Jonathan checks the maximum temperature of 33.5 degrees on 1st July at Oxford University's Radcliffe Meteorological Station

A pupil from Shipston High School was on hand last week to help University meteorologists record Oxford's third hottest July day since 1880.

Jonathan, aged 15, was on work experience at the School of Geography and Environment. He visited the Radcliffe Meteorological Station at Green Templeton College with the University's weather recorders. They recorded Wednesday's (1st July) maximum temperature at 33.5 degrees.

Jonathan, who is particularly interested in extreme weather events, said "Actually seeing the mercury line in the thermometer made it feel real".

Back at the School of Geography and Environment Jonathan searched through the original archives of weather recordings to discover that this year's 1st July temperature was beaten only twice since 1880: by 12th July, 1923 (33.9 degrees) and 19th July, 2006 (34.8 degrees).

In May this year the Radcliffe Station received an award from the UK Met Office in recognition of its 200th anniversary. The station holds the longest series of temperature and rainfall records for one site in Britain, with daily full records from 1815, and less frequent observations dating as far back as 1767.

The maximum temperature of 33.5 degrees on Wednesday 1st July was the 3rd highest for a July day since 1880 at Oxford University's Radcliffe Meteorological Station.

The maximum temperature of 33.5 degrees on Wednesday 1st July was the 3rd highest for a July day since 1880 at Oxford University's Radcliffe Meteorological Station.

Jonathan, who hopes to study Maths and Physics as well as Geography at A Level, had a varied week. Alongside recording weather measurements he also helped research the role of earthworms in the "big picture, total ecosystem" of Oxford's world famous Wytham Woods.