In July 2014, twenty enthusiastic and talented Year 12 Geographers attended the UNIQ Geography Summer School, part of the University's outreach programme for UK based state school students. As an innovation this year, there was also a UNIQ Taster Day attended by eight students. This is the fifth year of the UNIQ summer schools and over the past two years half of those who attended have gone on to gain places to read Geography at Oxford.

This year programme for the UNIQ Summer School included lectures on Cold War Cities (Dr Ian Klinke), Modern Conservation (Dr Richard Grenyer) and The Political Ecology of Fisheries Management (Dr Tom Thornton). At the start of the summer school the students were given a reading list on the topic of 'The future of the state' to prepare for a tutorial later in the week. They were given an introduction to the Radcliffe Science Library by the Geography Subject librarian and had two afternoons devoted to preparing for the tutorials. As an introduction to this topic, Dr Fiona McConnell gave a lecture on Contemporary Geographies of the Nation-State, which drew on her research on the state-like practices of the Tibetan Government-in-Exile based in India.

During the week students were introduced to climate modeling and prediction and spent a morning on a practical exercise using online climate change modeling software developed by the Climate Research group at the School of Geography and the Environment. One day of the summer school was devoted to field work based at Holywell Cemetery. During the field day, researchers from the Oxford Rock Breakdown Laboratory (OxRBL) introduced students to field techniques and equipment used for the monitoring of heritage sites. Students undertook group projects and later presented the results to researchers from the laboratory.

Researchers from the Oxford Rock Breakdown Laboratory (OxRBL) introduced students to field techniques and equipment used for the monitoring of heritage sites. Researchers from the Oxford Rock Breakdown Laboratory (OxRBL) introduced students to field techniques and equipment used for the monitoring of heritage sites.

Researchers from the Oxford Rock Breakdown Laboratory (OxRBL) introduced students to field techniques and equipment used for the monitoring of heritage sites.

On the UNIQ Taster Day, students had a lecture on Europe Divided? The wider implications of the crisis in Ukraine (Dr Lorraine Wild) and a tutorial on Resource abundance: blessing or curse? for which they had done preparatory reading prior to coming to Oxford. The afternoon session led by Dr Troy Sternberg was based in the Fellows' Garden at Worcester College testing equipment used for monitoring stone buildings in heritage sites.